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Things to do in The Woodlands

Hailed as one of United States’ top master-planned communities, The Woodlands in Texas offers more than being a quite sub-urban residential retreat. Surrounded by forests, The Woodlands has evolved from a bedroom community into a flourishing village that has many parks, school campuses, playgrounds, shopping centers, and golf courses. Visiting The Woodlands would guarantee that you, your family, and your friends will have a pleasurable experience due to a number of countless activities that the place can offer. Situated about 32 miles north of Houston, Texas, The Woodlands is located chiefly in a heavily forested district of Montgomery and Harris, Texas. It was an extension of the Mitchell Energy & Development, and was devoted to George Mitchell. Mitchell was an oil businessman who was interested in developing a suburban retreat that city-dwellers would find relaxing and enjoyable. Aside from the residential areas that cater to convenience, The Woodlands also has a variety of entertainment that appeals to people of all ages. The Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion has hosted a number of live concerts from known artists such as James Taylor, Dave Mathews Band, Tom Petty, and Sting. The Houston Symphony also has summer performances at the pavilion. Movies are also more interesting with the Cinemark Tinseltown 17 that features state-of-the-art sound systems and stadium seating for best movie experience. Life in The Woodlands won’t be boring since there are various entertainment options that you can go to, with sights and sounds that you will encounter. A couple of minutes walk can get you to anything from a place of worship to a cool shop, a hospital or any other places of interest. The flurry of activities and recreational areas is enough to provide anyone with a warm and welcomed feeling. With so many options for entertainment and leisure, The Woodlands is a great family-friendly destination.

Did you know…? Cruise Ship and Other Trivia

Most of us probably don’t know and don’t care about stuff we will probably encounter once and never again (unless you’re a Love Boat fanatic), but it is nonetheless interesting to know about this stuff once it is brought to your notice. For example, ever wonder what a “poop deck” actually is?

A poop deck is not the place of choice for dog-walkers to bring their charges, but refers to the raised portion at the back end of a ship, and its etymology can be traced back to ancient Rome. Back in the day, sailors would place sacred icons on an elevated dais in that area so that the crew and ship would receive the protection of that idol. These icons were called puppis and the platforms puppin. You see where this is going.

And there is more on deck etymology. Ever wonder why most cruise ships refer to something called a lido deck, typically where the swimming pool is found? The lido deck, also typically found near the aft or rear of the ship, is derived from the Italian term lido which means “beach.” In the 19th century, it was commonly the term used to denote an exclusive beach resort, and early transatlantic steamship lines borrowed the term to characterize the sundeck as the purview of their wealthier passengers. Today, anyone can go to the lido deck, but it is still typically where the pool and other outdoor activities are held.

Okay, so much for decks. Let’s move on to some –ests. The largest cruise ship ever built is currently the Allure of the Seas of Royal Caribbean International. Although registered in the Bahamas, its home port is in Florida, and regularly makes its rounds of Antigua, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Jamaica. It is so big that it has its own Starbucks, the first cruise ship to have one. It has a length of 1,187 feet, which is long enough to put five 747 planes tip to tail with room left over! It can accommodate 6,318 guests and has 2,384 people as the crew.
The oldest cruise ship operating as such is the Sea Cloud, currently owned by German company Hansa Ltd. and operated by Sea Cloud Cruises GmbH. It was originally commissioned as a private yacht in 1931, but it is big enough to accommodate 64 passengers. During World War II, it served as a weather ship for the U.S. Coast Guard. It has a length of 316 feet and regularly plies its route in the Caribbean and Europe.