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“Absolute” Liability under the Scaffold Law

Critics of New York Labor Law § 240, also known as the Scaffold Law, claim that it is driving up construction costs because of rocketing insurance premiums from the few insurers that still provide construction coverage. This is the same argument used by medical practitioners that are lobbying for medical malpractice law reforms, but the numbers show that insurance is not the problem. The problem is when the duty of care is breached and preventable accidents happen.

The construction industry is undoubtedly a hazardous occupation, and accidents will happen. The Scaffold Law is still in place more than 100 years since it was first enacted because it is an effective deterrent to construction companies and contractors to breach their duty of care towards their workers. This is exactly the purpose for which the Scaffold Law was designed, and despite numerous attempts to dislodge it is still there.

It would be exaggerating to say that the Scaffold Law guarantees an injured worker a win in a personal injury case. The law mandates that if it is proven that the injury from a fall from height accident was due to equipment failure i.e. defective or inadequate ladder, insufficient training i.e. poorly assembled scaffold, or lack of required safety measures i.e. guardrails, then the construction company is liable. If there are no safety violations on the work site, there will be no case.

Unfortunately, most construction sites do have evidence of safety problems which is why when a falling accident happens it is highly probable that the company will be found liable. Changing the law will not change that; if the worksite is unsafe, people will get hurt. The Scaffold Law serves merely as a silent threat to cost-cutting construction managers and companies in New York that is more effective than citations from building inspectors.

If you have been seriously injured in a falling accident, the Scaffold Law may apply to you. Present your case to experienced New York construction accident attorneys to find out if it does.

Yasmin and Acne

A lot of women have been using Yasmin as a birth-control pill, although it has other “benefits” such as easing the symptoms of severe PMS and acne. Even the manufacturer of the pill, Bayer, has advertised Yasmin as an effective treatment for moderate acne, thus prompting many women to ask if they can use it solely as an acne medication. But are they really an effective acne treatment?

Yasmin and acne seems to be popping up in the internet; many women have been asking if they are really effective or if there are side effects to stopping the medications. Yasmin is not actually approved to treat acne, even though many doctors have prescribed it as an “off-label” treatment for acne. This has led many to use it, therefore causing many women to suffer severe Yasmin side effects.

The main ingredients in Yasmin are drospirenone and ethinyl estradiol, and it is the presence of drospirenone that is said to counter the effects of certain “male” hormones (such as testosterone) in women that is often associated with acne. Suppressing these “male” hormones in women is believed to help prevent acne, and with Yasmin providing a steady dose of drospirenone, it makes sense as an acne treatment. Yasmin and acne seems to make sense to many women, thus they choose it an option for their moderate acne treatment aside from it being their birth-control pill.

A common side effect of many birth-control pills or contraceptive pills is acne, therefore it may be hard to determine if taking Yasmin can really be beneficial in treating acne. Although it is determined that Yasmin’s sister birth-control pill Yaz (which has a higher dosage of drospirenone) is a more effective treatment for acne, it does not really necessarily follow that Yasmin has the same effect. Some women do report to have noticeable improvement after taking Yasmin, however, if the acne gets worse it would be better to stop the medication and see your doctor to ask for different options.